A word to the wise: if you are just getting into freeride try out a smaller size wheel (think 60mm-65mm) with a harder durometer (82a or harder) because it will be easier to break away into a slide, making it easier to practice. Practice slides with friends and try different setups. Will you flat spot your first set of freeride wheels before coring them? Yes. Will they wear unevenly and leave you with a couple bruises? Absolutely. But, it gives you a whole new look at the hills, a whole new freedom. The great Cliff Coleman (father of downhill slide) says, “If you can crouch down and ride a skateboard, then you can learn this slide" as he talks about the classic Coleman slide.

As you gain experience, and speed, you'll find bigger wheels can be better because they will last longer and will be faster on the hill. Different durometers, center-set vs side-set or offset cores, and different urethane formulas will help in different weather/road conditions so make sure you experiment to find your favorites.

Freeride takes you to a new level of skating. Simply put, it's groundbreaking.

Carving/Cruising - For cruising park trails, taking big turns through your neighborhood, and general transportation riding; carving/cruising wheels meet the needs of many different skate disciplines. They fall in the middle of the size scale so you can ride down medium grade hills with some of the stability bigger wheels offer, but have the faster and larger range of motion of smaller wheels. Often, this category is great for beginners because the wheels tend to be softer, making them grippier. If you are looking to try slides look for wheels with a stone ground finish and/or a rounded lip. If your daily shredding includes a hill or two, try some bigger cruiser wheels with a square lip. No matter what you choose, carving/cruising wheels are going to be fun!

Item Specifications

Colour : Green